Extrapolations
Extrapolations

EXTRAPOLATIONS: An Online Exhibition
July 1, 2006 - June 15, 2007


Wigged Productions in collaboration with curator Humberto Ramirez presents Extrapolations.This online exhibition profiles Web-based conceptual artists working in video, animation, documentary and performance. Most of these works are situated outside of mainstream visual strategies, using anachronism, simulacra, radical denial, historical revision, nonlinear narratives, humor etc. The idea of critique as an oblique activity, tangential and tactical is central to this curatorial project.

No Power to Push Up the Sky (single-channel video and two-channel video
installation, 2001): Lana Lin


Lana Lin is a New York-based media artist who has interpreted histories in different cultural contexts, raising questions about translation and the processes of identification. Her work has been shown at the Museum
of Modern Art and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, China Taipei Film Archive, Taiwan, and the Festival de Femmes, Creteil, France. She has received numerous awards, including the New York State
Council on the Arts, the US Fulbright Foundation, and the Civitella Ranieri Foundation. Since 2001, she has been collaborating with H. Lan Thao Lam.
No Power to Push Up the Skypresents fifteen people translating a controversial interview with student protest
leader Chai Ling, conducted one week before the Tiananmen Square massacre, Beijing, 1989. Multiple narratives, conflicting positions, and overarching uncertainty demonstrate the complexities of locating
meaning across language, culture, and politics.

Unattended Body: Arzu Ozkal Telhan

Arzu Ozkal Telhan is a Turkish born media artist whose current work reflects on social and political conditions in the “third world” and the USA. She received her BFA from Bilkent University, and her MFA from SUNY at Buffalo. She is currently teaching new media courses at SUNY at Buffalo. Her performances involve public participation that encourages her audience to subvert accepted social practice - at least - for a moment. She has shown her work in Barcelona, Cologne, Istanbul, Pittsburgh, PA and Buffalo, NY.

Unattended Bodyis a body that attempts to disconnect him/herself from its characteristics and the characteristics of other people sharing the same place. It stands/sits still at places, avoids eye contact, does not carry any object which can help others to relate it to something/somewhere; no shopping cart at the grocery store, no gun or money bag at the bank, no plastic container at the gas station, no filthy clothes or disturbing odor, no sign for an emergency health problem, just a body – obviously a human body – sitting…

http://contrary.info/aot.info/index.shtml

Mouthpiece #2: Deva Eveland

Deva Eveland is a Chicago artist who creates performance based videos, installations, conceptual projects, and live art manifestations. His work has been shown in a number of galleries and festivals across the United States and Canada. He has recently been awarded a 2006 Illinois Arts Council Fellowship in New Performance Forms. His ‘Mouthpiece #2’is a video/performance that eloquently intersects the body and its sensations with the larger categories of nationalism, patriotism and warfare.

International Airport Montello: eteam

eteam’s members are Franziska Lamprecht and Hajoe Moderegger. Their work is guided by a process of understanding the circumstances and possibilities of a specific place or site. They have worked in such unusual sites as skyscrapers, public parks, the internet and the desert. Their projects have been recently featured in exhibitions at the P.S.1 and Momenta in New York City; the Soap Factory in Minneapolis; Grizedale Arts in England; MUMOK in Vienna; and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Spain, among other places.

International Airport Montellois a collaboration between the eteam and the people of Montello, Nevada. The project uses as canvas a 10-acre piece of land that eteam purchased in an auction on eBay.com near the town of Montello. It includes the production of events and memories about an abandoned airstrip (approximately 6,000 feet long and located nearby eteam’s land) to make of it local cultural paradigm. The project’s construction wiki-website is operated by eteam and the people of Montello.

http://www.meineigenheim.org/

Pandemic Rooms :Jason Nelson
While fearful of the ways seasons don't change in tropical Queensland Australia, Jason hides in cave-like office and makes odd creatures. His net artworks and digital poetics have appeared in galleries and journals (both real and virtually real) across the world.
With the world obsessed with the bird flu and whole industries being created preparing the corporate world for reduced work forces and face mask dress codes, I’ve created a new net artwork centering around all things pandemic. This artwork is built around the notion of empty rooms, defunct institutions whose occupants are gone. We are in love with the idea of catastrophic change, always watching for those invisible viral creatures filtering humanity.

http://www.secrettechnology.com/pandemic/

http://www.secrettechnology.com

All the News that’s Fit to Print: Jody Zelen

Jody Zelen is an artist living in Los Angeles, California. She works in many media simultaneously making photographs, installations, net art, public art, as well as artists’ books that explore the subject of the urban environment. She employs media-generated representations of contemporary and historic cities as raw material for aesthetic and social investigations.

All the News that’s fit to Print uses the daily New York Times as its point of departure. It explores the relationship between how the news and the images
that accompany headline stories are presented online and imprint. The lines between what is hard news and what is filler blur. The juxtapositions become wrong, sad, funny, inexplicable, and often to the
point. The headline and image are presented in conjunction with the daily paper’s image.
One is drawn to the initial layout, the language of the headline and to the sensationalism of the image.

http://www.allthenewsthatsfittoprint.net/

http://www.jodyzellen.com/

ReBurger: The Yes Men, Patrick Lichty - Dir. (2004-6)

The Yes Men have established a near legendary track as cultural saboteurs. Their ‘Identity Correction’ strategy has most notably included the WTO. The Yes Men, a movie, follows a couple of anti-corporate activist-pranksters as they impersonate World Trade Organization spokesmenon TV and at business conferences around the world. Andy and Mike—a couple of semi-employed, middle-class (at best) activists with only thrift-store clothes and no formal economics training—posed as spokespeople for the World Trade Organization. ReBurgeris a mock industrial video. In it, a scheme for a proposed food sustainability program by McDonald’s is unveiled, but there’s a catch...

http://www.theyesmen.org/

Hippopotamus: Peiyun Lee

Peiyun Lee is a Taiwan born artist. Her projects investigate language, culture and social conditions in Taiwan and the USA. She received her MFA from State University of New York at Buffalo in 2005. Recently relocated to Taipei Taiwan, she is currently teaching in National Taiwan University of Arts, department of Multimedia and Animation Arts. Her installations and performances have been exhibited in Buffalo NY, Ontario Canada and Taipei Taiwan.

Hippopotamus is a video document of a performance where Peiyun Lee practices the English pronunciation of letters A to Z.

Globalization
Globalization

GLOBALIZATION: An Online Exhibition
January 15 - December 31, 2004


The word Globalization is an increasing part of our contemporary vocabulary and a term that remains elusive regarding any singularity of interpretation. Nevertheless we all understand that the phenomenon of globalization constitutes a very real and dynamic bundle of processes affecting the totality of the world. Globalization is not by any means a new event but rather a continuum that has deep historical roots in the European expansionism of the 15thcentury. Since the rise of capital the ultimate dream of a global economy has been pursued on every possible front. The cultural, economic, and social realms have constituted the battlegrounds where European and American interests have applied their normative colonialist forces.

The realm of language, in all its aspects, has been the fundamental instrument with which the new subjectivities of the “globalized” have been reformed. Unfortunately the constitutive role of language remains immensely marginalized to academic discourse and it is only viewed with skepticism in the larger world. There, the Cartesian paradigm of interiority still governs notions of the self and as such produces and supports representational systems such as those of religion, nationalism, patriotism and the larger claims to truth and absolute values that those perceptions generally represent.

It would be only too easy to assume that globalization is by any means a discrete, coherently identifiable phenomenon. It would also be extremely simplistic to assume that any one value interpretation would encompass the myriad of effects that this phenomenon entails.

What seems clear is that the forces of the market override all other considerations and that local cultures as represented in verbal and visual languages, local economies, local histories are being erased as if hit by a powerful forces that steadily seek to re-represent subjectivity and desire. Unfortunately those affected by these new configurations are seldom encouraged to examine the hidden premises implied by this new hegemonic panorama.

The desiring subject more often than not is absorbed into this matrix of representations which in turn are perceived as intrinsically necessary and promising a form of deliverance from often abject poverty into the illusion of participation into the pleasures of abundance of the dominant culture.

Artists can potentially disrupt official language by destabilizing its signifying relations. The net art community is certainly working on an immensely important front. Through each of the tactical interventions presented here audiences are introduced into different cosmologies. All of them devoted to the intelligent and playful production of doubt and critical thinking.

Subtropics 2003
Subtropics 2003

Subtropics 03 Videos Online
January 15 - December 31, 2004 

Bass Museum / Miami Beach / Florida

Subtropics 03 Videos Online, co-produced by Wigged Productions and Subtropics New Music Festival, is an exhibition that addresses such issues as patriotism, colonialism, nationalism, and AIDS. Challenging in nature, these videos attempt to question current positions on these subjects. Curator Humberto Ramirez states, "The importance of these videos is that they do not retreat into the facile realm of the 'experimental' and 'abstract' but rather use the abilities of the medium to directly communicate and polemicize." Artists included are: Gregg Bordowitz, John Distefano, Elizabeth Hall, Mary Ann Toman, Craig Snyder, Deva Eveland and Jason Simon.

Mythologies
Mythologies

‘Mythologies’ Exhibit to Open at Landmark College Fine Arts Gallery

An exciting new show featuring works from nine regionally and nationally acclaimed artists opens to the public on Feb 23rd and runs through April 19th. The show includes works in video, collage, photography, painting and sculpture by artists Cynthia Atwood, Lucinda Bliss, Sabrina Fadial, Toby Gonzalez, Linda Adele Goodine, Amy Jenkins, Michael Oatman, Evie Lovett, Susan Newbold and Leonard Ragouzeos. Curated by Landmark’s art department chair Humberto Ramirez, a fundamental premise of the show is that “the most basic precondition for an object to become an artwork is that it communicates. A painting is no more an artwork than a brick, unless that painting or brick is able to engage in a critical discourse with history and the cultural conditions that determine its production.” Similarly, in keeping with Roland Barthes’ seminal text, “Mythologies” Ramirez views myths as a type of speech or language construction dependent on a “particular cultural moment to articulate their relevance”. In this show, he has assembled a stunning array of artworks that allow the viewer to make connections between the art and the myths from which they arise and to which they may lead. At its heart, Ramirez suggests that we read the works in the show as texts, with each piece viewed as a cultural construct, and a point of intersection for multiple modes of speech.

The videos of Amy Jenkins, the collages of Michael Oatman and the drawings of Leonard Ragouzeos, conjure up directly the mythic hero’s journey; either under the pretext of a science fiction apotheosis, through spectacular subjects and scale, or through the mysterious negotiations through which we claim or are assigned sexual and gender roles.

Similarly, in the photographic works of Evie Lovett, Toby Gonzalezand Susan Newbold, the body is the site where resistance is enacted, and normativity is exposed, deconstructed and challenged. In these works the body is understood as text and as such subject to the shifting and arbitrary conventions of language.

The paintings of Lucinda Blissand the photographs of Linda Adele Goodinerepresent nature and landscape as highly mediated

experiences. In these works artifice and carefully orchestrated codes reproduce an idea of nature as theater or as simulacra,

pointing to nature’s absence or non-existence.

In their sculptural works, Sabrina Fadialand Cynthia Atwooduse the agency of materiality to extrude from the discourse of desire a ‘body without organs’. In these works, membranes, limbs, petals, blood or genitals constitute an unstable syntax, a shifting grammar where the body is no longer anchored on the apparent certainty of the biological, but rather is set adrift onto a cosmology of signs.

The public is invited to the Opening Reception at the Landmark College Fine Arts Gallery on Sat, Feb. 28, 2-4 pm. The show runs until April 19th.. An artists panel will take place in late March.

Gallery hours are Mon-Friday, 11 am-6 pm, and Sundays, 1-6 pm

For more information on the show, contact:Humberto Ramirez /802 275 7845 /humbertoramirez@landmark.edu.

Reconsidering Identity

As President Obama confronts the legacies left by the previous administrations as well as deeply-rooted problems of race, class and ethnicity in American society, how will his unprecedented effort to promote pragmatic changes in the socio-political landscape effect the issue of identity in 21stCentury America?

It was with this question in mind that the artist Ting Yih sought out Humberto Ramirez and Angel Velasco Shaw, two fellow artists, curators and educators, to collaborate in organizing a show titled Reconsidering Identityto be held at Gallery 456. Each curator would select one artist to represent a perspective on the question of identity in the era of Obama.

Humberto Ramirez invited artist Hong-An Truong to present her single channel video 'A Measure of Remorse’ from 2009. This video problematizes the intersection of personal, national and historical memories through a deconstruction of a broadcast that took place in 1998 during PBS' NewsHour between the author Iris Chang, the Japanese ambassador to the U.S. Kunihiko Saito, and the journalist Elizabeth Farnsworth. The session was devoted to an examination of war crimes committed by the Japanese against the Chinese during World War II.

Angel Velasco Shaw selected Filipino mixed media installation artist Perry Mamaril, whose work continues to be influenced by the two thousand year old northern Luzon indigenous culture that was unconquerable by the Spaniards and the Americans. The beautiful and bountiful nature in this mountainous region in the Philippines where Mamaril hails from inspires his sense of aesthetic and creative process. Shaw chose his work for its relevance in examining notions of post-colonial identity.

Ting Yih chose Alan Chow, a Taiwan-born, Beijing Opera performer, who is also the founder and director of the 456 Gallery. Yih wishes to address the idea that identity is actually more fluid and indeterminate than generally assumed. He selected Chow because of Chow’s talent in playing roles as varied as old lady to teenage boy to young lady. By considering how identity is understood in the theatrical world, Yih hopes to shed some light on how it can be reconsidered in the social.

The open collaboration between the curators produces an exhibit that showcases a rich variety of artists both in their ethnicity as well as in the methods and mediums of the work. In so doing they aim to re-address the difficult question that once was topical in the art world, but remains a pressing and polarizing issue in America.

Video: Hong-An Truong 2009

Extrapolations
Globalization
Subtropics 2003
Mythologies
Reconsidering Identity
Extrapolations

EXTRAPOLATIONS: An Online Exhibition
July 1, 2006 - June 15, 2007


Wigged Productions in collaboration with curator Humberto Ramirez presents Extrapolations.This online exhibition profiles Web-based conceptual artists working in video, animation, documentary and performance. Most of these works are situated outside of mainstream visual strategies, using anachronism, simulacra, radical denial, historical revision, nonlinear narratives, humor etc. The idea of critique as an oblique activity, tangential and tactical is central to this curatorial project.

No Power to Push Up the Sky (single-channel video and two-channel video
installation, 2001): Lana Lin


Lana Lin is a New York-based media artist who has interpreted histories in different cultural contexts, raising questions about translation and the processes of identification. Her work has been shown at the Museum
of Modern Art and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, China Taipei Film Archive, Taiwan, and the Festival de Femmes, Creteil, France. She has received numerous awards, including the New York State
Council on the Arts, the US Fulbright Foundation, and the Civitella Ranieri Foundation. Since 2001, she has been collaborating with H. Lan Thao Lam.
No Power to Push Up the Skypresents fifteen people translating a controversial interview with student protest
leader Chai Ling, conducted one week before the Tiananmen Square massacre, Beijing, 1989. Multiple narratives, conflicting positions, and overarching uncertainty demonstrate the complexities of locating
meaning across language, culture, and politics.

Unattended Body: Arzu Ozkal Telhan

Arzu Ozkal Telhan is a Turkish born media artist whose current work reflects on social and political conditions in the “third world” and the USA. She received her BFA from Bilkent University, and her MFA from SUNY at Buffalo. She is currently teaching new media courses at SUNY at Buffalo. Her performances involve public participation that encourages her audience to subvert accepted social practice - at least - for a moment. She has shown her work in Barcelona, Cologne, Istanbul, Pittsburgh, PA and Buffalo, NY.

Unattended Bodyis a body that attempts to disconnect him/herself from its characteristics and the characteristics of other people sharing the same place. It stands/sits still at places, avoids eye contact, does not carry any object which can help others to relate it to something/somewhere; no shopping cart at the grocery store, no gun or money bag at the bank, no plastic container at the gas station, no filthy clothes or disturbing odor, no sign for an emergency health problem, just a body – obviously a human body – sitting…

http://contrary.info/aot.info/index.shtml

Mouthpiece #2: Deva Eveland

Deva Eveland is a Chicago artist who creates performance based videos, installations, conceptual projects, and live art manifestations. His work has been shown in a number of galleries and festivals across the United States and Canada. He has recently been awarded a 2006 Illinois Arts Council Fellowship in New Performance Forms. His ‘Mouthpiece #2’is a video/performance that eloquently intersects the body and its sensations with the larger categories of nationalism, patriotism and warfare.

International Airport Montello: eteam

eteam’s members are Franziska Lamprecht and Hajoe Moderegger. Their work is guided by a process of understanding the circumstances and possibilities of a specific place or site. They have worked in such unusual sites as skyscrapers, public parks, the internet and the desert. Their projects have been recently featured in exhibitions at the P.S.1 and Momenta in New York City; the Soap Factory in Minneapolis; Grizedale Arts in England; MUMOK in Vienna; and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Spain, among other places.

International Airport Montellois a collaboration between the eteam and the people of Montello, Nevada. The project uses as canvas a 10-acre piece of land that eteam purchased in an auction on eBay.com near the town of Montello. It includes the production of events and memories about an abandoned airstrip (approximately 6,000 feet long and located nearby eteam’s land) to make of it local cultural paradigm. The project’s construction wiki-website is operated by eteam and the people of Montello.

http://www.meineigenheim.org/

Pandemic Rooms :Jason Nelson
While fearful of the ways seasons don't change in tropical Queensland Australia, Jason hides in cave-like office and makes odd creatures. His net artworks and digital poetics have appeared in galleries and journals (both real and virtually real) across the world.
With the world obsessed with the bird flu and whole industries being created preparing the corporate world for reduced work forces and face mask dress codes, I’ve created a new net artwork centering around all things pandemic. This artwork is built around the notion of empty rooms, defunct institutions whose occupants are gone. We are in love with the idea of catastrophic change, always watching for those invisible viral creatures filtering humanity.

http://www.secrettechnology.com/pandemic/

http://www.secrettechnology.com

All the News that’s Fit to Print: Jody Zelen

Jody Zelen is an artist living in Los Angeles, California. She works in many media simultaneously making photographs, installations, net art, public art, as well as artists’ books that explore the subject of the urban environment. She employs media-generated representations of contemporary and historic cities as raw material for aesthetic and social investigations.

All the News that’s fit to Print uses the daily New York Times as its point of departure. It explores the relationship between how the news and the images
that accompany headline stories are presented online and imprint. The lines between what is hard news and what is filler blur. The juxtapositions become wrong, sad, funny, inexplicable, and often to the
point. The headline and image are presented in conjunction with the daily paper’s image.
One is drawn to the initial layout, the language of the headline and to the sensationalism of the image.

http://www.allthenewsthatsfittoprint.net/

http://www.jodyzellen.com/

ReBurger: The Yes Men, Patrick Lichty - Dir. (2004-6)

The Yes Men have established a near legendary track as cultural saboteurs. Their ‘Identity Correction’ strategy has most notably included the WTO. The Yes Men, a movie, follows a couple of anti-corporate activist-pranksters as they impersonate World Trade Organization spokesmenon TV and at business conferences around the world. Andy and Mike—a couple of semi-employed, middle-class (at best) activists with only thrift-store clothes and no formal economics training—posed as spokespeople for the World Trade Organization. ReBurgeris a mock industrial video. In it, a scheme for a proposed food sustainability program by McDonald’s is unveiled, but there’s a catch...

http://www.theyesmen.org/

Hippopotamus: Peiyun Lee

Peiyun Lee is a Taiwan born artist. Her projects investigate language, culture and social conditions in Taiwan and the USA. She received her MFA from State University of New York at Buffalo in 2005. Recently relocated to Taipei Taiwan, she is currently teaching in National Taiwan University of Arts, department of Multimedia and Animation Arts. Her installations and performances have been exhibited in Buffalo NY, Ontario Canada and Taipei Taiwan.

Hippopotamus is a video document of a performance where Peiyun Lee practices the English pronunciation of letters A to Z.

Globalization

GLOBALIZATION: An Online Exhibition
January 15 - December 31, 2004


The word Globalization is an increasing part of our contemporary vocabulary and a term that remains elusive regarding any singularity of interpretation. Nevertheless we all understand that the phenomenon of globalization constitutes a very real and dynamic bundle of processes affecting the totality of the world. Globalization is not by any means a new event but rather a continuum that has deep historical roots in the European expansionism of the 15thcentury. Since the rise of capital the ultimate dream of a global economy has been pursued on every possible front. The cultural, economic, and social realms have constituted the battlegrounds where European and American interests have applied their normative colonialist forces.

The realm of language, in all its aspects, has been the fundamental instrument with which the new subjectivities of the “globalized” have been reformed. Unfortunately the constitutive role of language remains immensely marginalized to academic discourse and it is only viewed with skepticism in the larger world. There, the Cartesian paradigm of interiority still governs notions of the self and as such produces and supports representational systems such as those of religion, nationalism, patriotism and the larger claims to truth and absolute values that those perceptions generally represent.

It would be only too easy to assume that globalization is by any means a discrete, coherently identifiable phenomenon. It would also be extremely simplistic to assume that any one value interpretation would encompass the myriad of effects that this phenomenon entails.

What seems clear is that the forces of the market override all other considerations and that local cultures as represented in verbal and visual languages, local economies, local histories are being erased as if hit by a powerful forces that steadily seek to re-represent subjectivity and desire. Unfortunately those affected by these new configurations are seldom encouraged to examine the hidden premises implied by this new hegemonic panorama.

The desiring subject more often than not is absorbed into this matrix of representations which in turn are perceived as intrinsically necessary and promising a form of deliverance from often abject poverty into the illusion of participation into the pleasures of abundance of the dominant culture.

Artists can potentially disrupt official language by destabilizing its signifying relations. The net art community is certainly working on an immensely important front. Through each of the tactical interventions presented here audiences are introduced into different cosmologies. All of them devoted to the intelligent and playful production of doubt and critical thinking.

Subtropics 2003

Subtropics 03 Videos Online
January 15 - December 31, 2004 

Bass Museum / Miami Beach / Florida

Subtropics 03 Videos Online, co-produced by Wigged Productions and Subtropics New Music Festival, is an exhibition that addresses such issues as patriotism, colonialism, nationalism, and AIDS. Challenging in nature, these videos attempt to question current positions on these subjects. Curator Humberto Ramirez states, "The importance of these videos is that they do not retreat into the facile realm of the 'experimental' and 'abstract' but rather use the abilities of the medium to directly communicate and polemicize." Artists included are: Gregg Bordowitz, John Distefano, Elizabeth Hall, Mary Ann Toman, Craig Snyder, Deva Eveland and Jason Simon.

Mythologies

‘Mythologies’ Exhibit to Open at Landmark College Fine Arts Gallery

An exciting new show featuring works from nine regionally and nationally acclaimed artists opens to the public on Feb 23rd and runs through April 19th. The show includes works in video, collage, photography, painting and sculpture by artists Cynthia Atwood, Lucinda Bliss, Sabrina Fadial, Toby Gonzalez, Linda Adele Goodine, Amy Jenkins, Michael Oatman, Evie Lovett, Susan Newbold and Leonard Ragouzeos. Curated by Landmark’s art department chair Humberto Ramirez, a fundamental premise of the show is that “the most basic precondition for an object to become an artwork is that it communicates. A painting is no more an artwork than a brick, unless that painting or brick is able to engage in a critical discourse with history and the cultural conditions that determine its production.” Similarly, in keeping with Roland Barthes’ seminal text, “Mythologies” Ramirez views myths as a type of speech or language construction dependent on a “particular cultural moment to articulate their relevance”. In this show, he has assembled a stunning array of artworks that allow the viewer to make connections between the art and the myths from which they arise and to which they may lead. At its heart, Ramirez suggests that we read the works in the show as texts, with each piece viewed as a cultural construct, and a point of intersection for multiple modes of speech.

The videos of Amy Jenkins, the collages of Michael Oatman and the drawings of Leonard Ragouzeos, conjure up directly the mythic hero’s journey; either under the pretext of a science fiction apotheosis, through spectacular subjects and scale, or through the mysterious negotiations through which we claim or are assigned sexual and gender roles.

Similarly, in the photographic works of Evie Lovett, Toby Gonzalezand Susan Newbold, the body is the site where resistance is enacted, and normativity is exposed, deconstructed and challenged. In these works the body is understood as text and as such subject to the shifting and arbitrary conventions of language.

The paintings of Lucinda Blissand the photographs of Linda Adele Goodinerepresent nature and landscape as highly mediated

experiences. In these works artifice and carefully orchestrated codes reproduce an idea of nature as theater or as simulacra,

pointing to nature’s absence or non-existence.

In their sculptural works, Sabrina Fadialand Cynthia Atwooduse the agency of materiality to extrude from the discourse of desire a ‘body without organs’. In these works, membranes, limbs, petals, blood or genitals constitute an unstable syntax, a shifting grammar where the body is no longer anchored on the apparent certainty of the biological, but rather is set adrift onto a cosmology of signs.

The public is invited to the Opening Reception at the Landmark College Fine Arts Gallery on Sat, Feb. 28, 2-4 pm. The show runs until April 19th.. An artists panel will take place in late March.

Gallery hours are Mon-Friday, 11 am-6 pm, and Sundays, 1-6 pm

For more information on the show, contact:Humberto Ramirez /802 275 7845 /humbertoramirez@landmark.edu.

Reconsidering Identity

As President Obama confronts the legacies left by the previous administrations as well as deeply-rooted problems of race, class and ethnicity in American society, how will his unprecedented effort to promote pragmatic changes in the socio-political landscape effect the issue of identity in 21stCentury America?

It was with this question in mind that the artist Ting Yih sought out Humberto Ramirez and Angel Velasco Shaw, two fellow artists, curators and educators, to collaborate in organizing a show titled Reconsidering Identityto be held at Gallery 456. Each curator would select one artist to represent a perspective on the question of identity in the era of Obama.

Humberto Ramirez invited artist Hong-An Truong to present her single channel video 'A Measure of Remorse’ from 2009. This video problematizes the intersection of personal, national and historical memories through a deconstruction of a broadcast that took place in 1998 during PBS' NewsHour between the author Iris Chang, the Japanese ambassador to the U.S. Kunihiko Saito, and the journalist Elizabeth Farnsworth. The session was devoted to an examination of war crimes committed by the Japanese against the Chinese during World War II.

Angel Velasco Shaw selected Filipino mixed media installation artist Perry Mamaril, whose work continues to be influenced by the two thousand year old northern Luzon indigenous culture that was unconquerable by the Spaniards and the Americans. The beautiful and bountiful nature in this mountainous region in the Philippines where Mamaril hails from inspires his sense of aesthetic and creative process. Shaw chose his work for its relevance in examining notions of post-colonial identity.

Ting Yih chose Alan Chow, a Taiwan-born, Beijing Opera performer, who is also the founder and director of the 456 Gallery. Yih wishes to address the idea that identity is actually more fluid and indeterminate than generally assumed. He selected Chow because of Chow’s talent in playing roles as varied as old lady to teenage boy to young lady. By considering how identity is understood in the theatrical world, Yih hopes to shed some light on how it can be reconsidered in the social.

The open collaboration between the curators produces an exhibit that showcases a rich variety of artists both in their ethnicity as well as in the methods and mediums of the work. In so doing they aim to re-address the difficult question that once was topical in the art world, but remains a pressing and polarizing issue in America.

Video: Hong-An Truong 2009

show thumbnails